Thing 3: Image banks

In my library, I tend to be the one that produces in-house publicity, such as posters and social media posts. I’m a big believer in Visual Communication (I actually applied for a degree in this at Glasgow School of Art when I was leaving school), and the power of images to communicate a message and enhance content.

When we produce in-house publicity, we’re usually doing this over and above our usual duties and won’t have all day to do this. Library staff – who really should know their copyright dos and don’ts – are often guilty of using images without attribution, and without even checking if an image can be reused.

Last year a colleague introduced me to Pixabay, a great resource for high quality, free images. All images are released under Creative Commons CC0, which makes them safe to use without asking for permission or giving credit to the artist – even for commercial purposes.

CC0

You can download an image after completing an I am not a robot CAPCHTA, or create a free Pixabay account to avoid this. Since learning about this resource I’ve been recommending it to customers, particularly schoolchildren undertaking homework in the library.

Although Pixabay’s images are free to use without attribution, I thought I’d take this opportunity to do some attribution practice!

floating book

‘book-exposition-composition-poland-436507’ by jarmoluk is licensed under CC BY CC0 1.0

I’ll be using this method from now on when I produce in-house publicity, in order to demonstrate image attribution best practice to colleagues and customers.

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One thought on “Thing 3: Image banks

  1. Hi Michelle, first off, congratulations on the wedding! And secondly, good for you, actively demonstrating image attribution best practice in your own posters. Definitely a top tip which I might share to the @Rudai23 Twitter ac later.
    Good luck with the rest of the course.
    Michelle.

    Liked by 1 person

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